About us

Helix is a Special District

A special district is a local government agency formed by voters to perform a  needed service, such as water or sewer. Most are governed by a Board elected from their communities and are effective service providers because they are held to high standards of transparency and accountability.

Open Meetings

The Ralph M. Brown Act requires that the public is notified of Board meetings and able to attend.

District Calendar

Full Disclosure

The Fair Political Practices Commission requires Board members and Helix staff to file a Statement of Economic Interest annually, reporting any gifts or monies received.

Key Documents

Ethics Training

Assembly Bill 1234 requires Board members to attend ethics training upon election or appointment, and re-certify every two years.

FINANCIAL Audits

State law requires special districts to submit regular audits performed by a certified public accountant to ensure public funds are properly managed. The audits are public documents filed with the state and county controller.

Public Review

Special districts must upload their financial reports and Board member and employee compensation to the state controller’s website for public review.

State Controller’s Website

Financial Reports

i

Public Records

The California Public Records Act gives the public the right to request and access information from public agencies.

Key Documents

OUR MISSION STATEMENT

Helix Water District is a progressive industry leader, providing high quality water, through an efficient and reliable system. Our innovative and dedicated employees and board members maximize human and technological resources, while providing superior service to our customers and supporting the environment for a sustainable future.

OUR HISTORY

Helix was formed in 1912 and became an operating entity in 1926 under the Irrigation District Law of California, Water Code sections 20500 et seq.

Photo: water flowing through the flume on
its way from Lake Cuyamaca to La Mesa, c.1910.

1885

The San Diego Flume Company built Cuyamaca Dam and began work on 33.5 miles of wooden flume to transport water to San Diego. The flume delivers water for the first time in 1889.

1910

Ed Fletcher and James Murray buy the San Diego Flume Company and rename it the Cuyamaca Water Company.

1912

East County residents, farmers and growers unite to form the La Mesa, Lemon Grove and Spring Valley Irrigation District and find their own source of water.

1926

The La Mesa, Lemon Grove and Spring Valley Irrigation District assumes ownership of the Cuyamaca Water Company.

1940

Metropolitan Water District of Southern California completes the Colorado River Aqueduct.

1941

San Diego representatives lobby Congress for funds to connect San Diego County to Colorado River water.

1944

The San Diego County Water Authority is formed to administer the region’s Colorado River water rights and the La Mesa, Lemon Grove and Spring Valley Irrigation District is a charter member.

1954

El Cajon Valley Irrigation District joins the La Mesa, Lemon Grove and Spring Valley Irrigation District.

1956

The La Mesa, Lemon Grove and Spring Valley Irrigation District is renamed Helix Irrigation District.

1962

Chet Harritt Dam is completed in Lakeside and Lake Jennings begins to fill.

1965

R.M. Levy Water Treatment Plant is completed and Lake Jennings opens for fishing.

1968

Construction of new pipeline brings treated water to Helix’s entire service area for the first time.

1973

California’s Legislature approves a new name: Helix Water District.

Setting standards of excellence in public service.

We are responsible for the safety, quality and reliability of the drinking water for over 273,000 people in San Diego's East County.

© 2017 Helix Water District

Font Size
Contrast
Share This